Skip to main content

About your Search

20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
whole and total package. for years i have said, to have a growing economy and a just social environment, we needed to make as americans, critical investments. you hit three of those critical investments. you talked about research. absolutely critical investment in the future growth of the economy, and to solve today and tomorrow's problems. that's research, most of which, interestingly, is funded directly by the federal government, by the national institutes of health, darpa or one of the other federal agencies or indirectly through the research tax credit that we provide for businesses to engage in research. so research being one of the investments that lead to economic growth. you mentioned the second one, very interesting, and that's education. well-educated work force will be competitive across the world. that is the most critical investment. again, a role for the federal government, certainly a role for states and local governments, but a role for the american society that cannot be ignored. research education. and you drew it very, very correctly, and that is the manufacturing tha
attitudes and support for specific policy proposals. and i think in this really fast- paced environment of policy deliberation over this issue, it is critical to understand how the public thinks about proposals to strengthen gun laws. we live in a democracy and we should care about what the public thinks and we should bring the best research methods available to bear on identifying how the level of support and the population overall but also to understand how support may vary across importance of groups across our society. this is what we did. we designed a survey data collection and demint to determine support for 33 policies among americans over all by gun ownership and stratified by political party identification. and we looked at gun ownership -- most was done as of the typical 1000 person poll. it is hard to get precise estimates using the approach for smaller subgroups within the public opinion poll. in our survey we substantially over sampled gun owners and non- gun owners living in households with guns. we design the survey over christmas -- we apologize for family members that
, in a safe way, in a way that helps the environment, in a way that helps the economy and the local community and all of the above. but we've been an entitlement -- in entitlement processes around the country that have taken over 20 years. so if you think about projects -- and we're in one right now that i won't name exactly where it is, but it's been over 20 years. we have a project down in tampa, florida, that took us 21 years to open. so it's now the most successful shopping center in that region. it's created at least 3-4,000 permanent jobs. a huge spin-off and a huge catalyst for all kinds of growth. but why should it take us 21 years to do something that's really good? and i think that's the problem. you know, regulation is necessary, but regulation has to have its place. there has to be a balance. and, you know, sort of determining the size of government, a lot of people have said, it should be the people's will, but it doesn't feel that way. and bigger is not always better. and, you know, the idea of a faster and smarter government, you know, i said earlier is really sort of like an o
don't know. you can't ignore the complex interplay between biology and environment when it comes to this illness. >> what about the ethnic factor? we always talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it lack of tolerance? what's the terms? is there a term for it? is there legacy? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and there's an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, preen. nine out of ten addicts started when they were teenagers. if the brain is still developing and you hijack it with the use of experimentation of marijuana, drugs, you're -- >> you don't like these laws legalizing marijuana. >> no, i don't. i think we need the public health community to be -- weigh in here because we already know what the liquor industry and the tobacco industry have done to our country in targeting kids. and so we need to be mindful and not rush into this -- >> like joe camel, that kind of stuff. >> exactly. joe camel. liquor stores are in places where you know that there are people who are going to abuse liquor and
and the environment hosted for rum. the head of fema will discuss hurricane katrina, the ongoing drought and earthquake in japan. that is on c-span 3 at 830 eastern. then the brookings institution event on innovation and the economy. >> in light of the postponement of the inauguration thehugo cha -- the inauguration of hugo chavez. this is just over an hour. >> a reminder to turn off your cell phones or anything that beeps. we appreciate that very much. well, everybody, good morning. it sounds like church almost. pretty good. [laughter] we are very pleased that you have chosen to join us on a great day here in washington. we hope the conversation will be more lively in here than the weather outside. thank you for taking some time to join us today. ambassadors, congressman, knowledgeable observers all, the quality of the audience is a very knowledgeable and experienced group that have followed venezuela for some time. so you have a very good group of folks that you're talking to. so you have to be on your best behavior. please make sure that you are. last thursday, january because, feliz
into the international environment, which makes it more complex, but let me use that as a segue. we know and hear about economic impact repeatedly, but who speaks for the environment, and how can we keep that the boys drowned out as a difference for -- voice from being drowned out as a result of a difference of relationships? how do we close the cycle of latency and try to understand where we need information? >> let me start with a comment you made, which i found to be fascinating, that there is between a $11 and $30 for every dollar spent. an ounce of prevention is worth every cure. that is a 16 fold ratio. we know that. our policy has to put that in place. we need a baseline. of course we do. the only thing forcing the baseline is smart companies, and they may as well get a baseline, because they will show we started which dirty water, but there are no resources to get the baseline. we know we need to drill the northeast over the next couple days. -- decades. we need that baseline. we need it desperately, and we needed for human health as well. lots of different communities have different kinds of d
't ignore the interplay between biology and environment. >> what about the fact that we talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it a lack of tolerance? is there a term for it? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, prevention. nine out of ten addicts started when they were teenagers. if the brain is still developing and you hijack it, you're permanently -- >> you don't like these laws legalizing marijuana? >> no, i don't. i think we need the public health community to weigh in here. so we need to be mindful, and not jump into this. >> like joe camel and that kind of stuff. >> exactly. liquor stores. liquor stores are places where people are going to abuse liquor and have easy access. >> this is too hot. the hottest topic in this country right now is gun safety. your family has been victimized. because of your family being victims, we are all victims. what is your feeling? >> it's not just the person that's killed, like my uncles. it's the whole family. so my father surv
by a more balanced growth, growth that is more compatible with the sustainability of our environment and the fight against climate change. what does the need for us? i remind you that, in 2013, the imf is stronger, better equipped financially. it has certainly refined some of its tools. we'll continue to strengthen our surveillance, especially on spillover effects and on the financial sector. we will continue to strengthen our support for the entire spectrum of members through lending, capacity building, training and technical assistance. in other words, we're not only serving the needs of a selected group of companies -- a group of countries, but the entire membership. when you look at the world and see where our teams are, where there is building and technical assistance in programs, we are all over the map. and we will continue to push ahead with the important and not complete reform of " and governance. we are in three stages, two are completed. we are certainly short of a few members, one of which is obviously a key member. that is all everyone into open bar conference with. i w
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)